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 IU Trident Indiana University

Searching for neuronal network complexity in jawless vertebrates

Project Leads: Ravi V, Yu WP, Pillai NE, Lian MM, Tay B-H, Tohari S, Brenner S, Venkatesh B.

Research made possible by: National Center for Genome Analysis Support (NCGAS), Scientific Applications and Performance Tuning (SciAPT)

Searching for neuronal network complexity in jawless vertebrates
Figure 1. Paralogous protocadherin loci in the human, elephant shark, and Japanese lamprey genomes.
In collaboration with the Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, the National Center for Genome Analysis Support has made available a Galaxy website that allows cancer researchers around the world to easily perform transcriptomic analysis on their data. One of the institutes/research centers recently making use of this facility was the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR, Singapore. In their recent work analyzing protocadherin genes in cyclostomes (jawless vertebrates), the team, led by Prof. B. Venkatesh, discovered that cyclostomes lack the clustered type of protocadherins which are present in all jawed vertebrates and are responsible for their neuronal complexity. Part of the analyses, which involved generating assembled transcriptomes from sea lamprey embryos, was done using the NCGAS facility. The results of this analyses have been published recently in Molecular Biology and Evolution.

The mission of the National Center for Genome Analysis Support (NCGAS) is to enable the biological research community of the US to analyze, understand, and make use of the vast amount of genomic information now available. NCGAS focuses particularly on transcriptome- and genome-level assembly, phylogenetics, metagenomics/transcriptomics and community genomics.

The mission of the Scientific Applications and Performance Tuning (SciAPT) group is to deliver and support software tools that promote effective and efficient use of IU's advanced cyberinfrastructure which, in turn, improves research and enables discoveries.

NSF GSS Codes:

Primary Field: Neurobiology and Neuroscience (950)

Secondary Field:  Neurobiology and Anatomy